News Archive

The current assistant vice president of TLA will succeed David Allen, who is retiring effective April 28 after a six-year tenure of reinvigorating the UA's research commercialization.
The 2000-2010 drought that killed livestock and drove nomadic herders to migrate to cities was rare but not unprecedented, according to a team that included a UA dendrochronologist.
A wealth of connected-vehicle research by professor Larry Head is helping to determine how people will move about in the cities of tomorrow. With UANews video. The series Fast Forward is examining the UA's role in the convergence of the digital, physical and biological worlds.
A drought-induced water crisis in Cape Town, South Africa, has Arizonans wondering if a similar situation could happen here. UA water expert Sharon Megdal says it's unlikely.
Tech Launch Arizona held its annual I-Squared Expo and Awards event, and UA President Robert C. Robbins joined in to celebrate the honorees and their accomplishments.
Astronomer Vishnu Reddy and aerospace engineering graduate student Tanner Campbell are following the path of Tiangong-1, using technology they developed in only four months.
A full day of activities at Biosphere 2 will conclude with a DRL event, scheduled to be televised internationally in the fall on ESPN and other sports networks.
How will agriculture feed a world population approaching 10 billion? At the UA, researchers are looking up for answers, in the form of vertical farming. With UANews video. The series Fast Forward is examining the UA's role in the convergence of the digital, physical and biological worlds.
The William A. Hanacek Endowed Memorial Scholarship funds research by Elizabeth Bowman, making it possible to balance her education with responsibilities as a wife and mother.
The HOSTS Survey is helping to determine how big future telescopes should be, which stars are candidates for harboring Earth-like planets and what the average star system looks like.
A manned mission to Mars can succeed only if no vital parts of the system break beyond repair — including those that are human. Technology will need to address issues before they occur, says UA professor Wolfgang Fink. With UANews video. The series Fast Forward is examining the UA's role in the convergence of the digital, physical and biological worlds.
Visible only because it is magnified by the gravity of a massive galaxy cluster, Icarus is 9 billion light-years away from Earth, making it the farthest individual star ever seen.
New research led by the UA's Kaveh Laksari indicates that traumatic brain injury is caused by stretching and straining of tissue well below the surface of the brain.
Many agricultural crops such as blueberries, chili peppers and tomatoes rely on bees that have adapted a vibration technique to access hidden pollen, researcher Stephen Buchmann says.
A project that involves growing plants beneath photovoltaic solar panels at Biosphere 2 is led by Greg Barron-Gafford in the UA School of Geography and Development.
People with a rare neurodegenerative disease called primary progressive aphasia may recruit intact brain areas for help with language, according to a study led by a UA scientist.
In a technology universe where there are more questions than answers, UA researchers are calling for a collective approach toward the thorny issues of data privacy, algorithmic discrimination and the spread of "fake news" online. The series Fast Forward is examining the UA's role in the convergence of the digital, physical and biological worlds.
More than 150 scientists, students and volunteers participated in a "Border BioBlitz" that highlighted the diversity of the area through which the U.S.-Mexico border runs.
A young cyber operations program, based on the UA South campus but fully online, provides students with uncommon hands-on training for a wealth of career opportunities. With UANews video. This is the final installment in the eight-part series Fast Forward, which has examined the UA's role in the convergence of the digital, physical and biological worlds.
The TEALS program, which operates in nearly 350 U.S. high schools, will grow to reach more students in Tucson and southern Arizona in the 2018-2019 academic year.

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